US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dead at 87

US Supreme Court Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg has lost her long battle with pancreatic cancer and died aged 87. The court announced her passing.

“Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died this evening surrounded by her family at her home in Washington, D.C., due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer,” Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. said of Justice Ginsburg was a tireless champion of justice.

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague.” the Chief Justice said in a statement, “Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

A leader in the fight for women’s rights in the 1970’s, Ginsburg was a appointed to America’s highest court and served for 27 years. She was one of it’s most prominent members and most liberal judges.

Last week she released a statement via her granddaughter saying, “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Clinton. She was the second woman to be appointed to the court following the 1981 appointment of Sandra Day O’Connor.

Justice Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York, March 15, 1933. She married Martin D. Ginsburg in 1954. She received her B.A. from Cornell University, attended Harvard Law School, and received her LL.B. from Columbia Law School.

She served as a law clerk to the Honorable Edmund L. Palmieri, Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, from 1959–1961. From 1961–1963, she was a research associate and then associate director of the Columbia Law School Project on International Procedure. She was a Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law from 1963–1972, and Columbia Law School from 1972–1980, and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California from 1977–1978.

In 1971, she was instrumental in launching the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union, and served as the ACLU’s General Counsel from 1973–1980, and on the National Board of Directors from 1974–1980. She was appointed a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1980.

OIP Staff


Love OUTinPerth Campaign

Help support the publication of OUTinPerth by contributing to our
GoFundMe campaign.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Comments